Anesthesia & Presurgical Instructions


What Kind of Anesthesia Do You Provide?

The administration and monitoring of general anesthesia may vary depending on the type of procedure, the type of practitioner, the age and health of the patient and the setting in which anesthesia is provided. Risks may vary with each specific situation. You are encouraged to explore all anesthesia options available for your dental treatment and consult with your dentist or pediatrician as needed.

Dr. Walker will be performing the surgery and delivering anesthesia.  Dr. Walker is licensed in the state of California as a Medical Doctor, Dentist, and maintains a state licensure to deliver general anesthesia. 

Local Anesthesia
A local anesthetic is administered in the area that the surgery is performed.  Unless otherwise directed, you can take your normal daily medications except blood thinners.  Dr. Walker will provide guidance and may consult your physician prior to discontinuing blood thinner medications.  You do not have to fast prior to surgery and there are no dietary restrictions.  You may drive yourself to and from your surgical appointment and do not need to be accompanied by a family member or friend.

Local Anesthesia with Nitrous Oxide
Nitrous oxide is also known as “laughing gas” and is used in conjunction with a local anesthetic administered in the area that the surgery is performed.  Nitrous oxide is delivered by a nasal mask that covers your nose.  It can decrease the discomfort and anxiety associated with the procedure.  Most people equate nitrous oxide to a few glasses of wine.  Nitrous oxide does not stay in your system. You may drive yourself to and from your surgical appointment and do not need to be accompanied by a family member or friend.  Unless otherwise directed, you can take your normal daily medications except blood thinners.  Dr. Walker will provide guidance and may consult your physician prior to discontinuing blood thinner medications. 

Intravenous (IV) Sedation
IV sedation is administered through an intravenous line and allows you to fall completely asleep throughout the procedure. IV anesthesia is commonly used to facilitate wisdom teeth removal, dental implant placement, bone grafting, and many other surgical procedures. This anesthetic option can also be utilized when patients experience anxiety.  When you are asleep, a local anesthetic is administered in the area that the surgery is performed.  This provides comfort when you awake from your procedure.  You can discuss with Dr. Walker the amount of sedation you would like: light sedation, mostly awake, moderate sedation, in and out of sleep or a deep anesthesia where you are breathing on your own but unaware of the procedure.

Prior to IV Sedation:

  • Do not eat or drink (including water) for six (6) hours prior to surgery.
  • Take your normal morning high blood pressure medications with a sip of water.
  • Dr. Walker will advise you on other medication including the use of blood thinners.
  • You must have someone to drive you to and from your surgical appointment and remain with you the day of surgery.
  • Your ride must remain in the office until your surgery is completed.
  • Plan on resting at home the day of surgery.
  • Contact lenses, jewelry (including lip and tongue piercings), and dentures must be removed at the time of surgery.
  • Do not wear lipstick, excessive makeup, or nail polish on the day of surgery.
  • If you develop a head or chest cold, fever, sore throat, or stomach or bowel upset, please notify our office as soon as possible before surgery. Your procedure may need to be rescheduled.
  • Do not drive a car the day of surgery or undertake any important matters for 24 hours after surgery.
  • Do not take your antibiotics the morning of surgery.

Anesthesiologist
If you are very anxious, intravenous sedation may not be effective in allowing you to completely fall asleep.  Dr. Walker can arrange for an MD anesthesiologist to provide a general anesthetic.  In this way, you will have total relaxation and be asleep for the procedure.  Follow the same preoperative instructions as listed above under intravenous sedation.